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Last Updated: Tuesday, 3 August, 2004, 17:30 GMT 18:30 UK
Forest toilet design earns praise
The toilet block in Llanddwyn
The curved roof of the toilet block was inspired by a ship
If you go down to the woods today you may be in for a surprise, because a forestry toilet block has been named as an notable piece of architecture.

The design of the toilet block in Newborough Forestry on Anglesey has been commended by judges at the National Eisteddfod.

The conveniences in Llanddwyn on the island were designed by Llangefni based architects Russell Hughes.

Judges described the design as "the breaking of a mould".

Although the judges for the Architecture in Wales competition did not chose the toilet block as the winning entry, they praised the design of the building.

"It was so pleasing to see the breaking of a mould for such a humble and no doubt low-cost building and the exploring or organic forms and more forest and earth related materials for such a rural setting," they said.

Russell Hughes, whose practice came up with the design said he was "very happy" that the building had been commended by the eisteddfod judges.

The toilet block in Llanddwyn
The design of the building impressed eisteddfod judges

"Obviously we would have like to have won, but we are very happy with the design," he said.

He said that the firm had been asked to come up with plans for a new toilet block in the forestry after the old ones were burned down.

"We used as much local materials as we could," he said.

"We have got local timber, Welsh slate on the floor and we are really pleased with how the building has taken shape."

The toilet block cost 120,000 to build and has incorporated a number of environmentally sound features including using a reed bed as part of the drainage.

"It sits very well in the forestry because there are a lot of curves and contours in the land and it snuggles in well," said Mr Hughes.

He said the design influence came from a ship against a harbour wall and that was reflected in the unusual curved roof of the building.

"This is the first time we have entered the National Eisteddfod because we felt we had a building which we would be pleased to put in an exhibition or competition.

"We are very happy - we are unhappy that we didn't win but we are very happy," he added.

Robyn Tomos, the visual arts officer for the eisteddfod said that there had been a very high level of entries to this years competition.



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